August 3, 2021

Firearm Upgrages

Firearm Reviews, Updates, & Product Alerts

How Do You Overcome Left Eye Dominance When You Are A Right Handed Shooter?

Eye dominance refers to the tendency to favor one eye over the other when you try to maintain your binocular vision. The situation occurs at the subconscious level, and it affects a good number of shooters out there. People with this condition have brains that naturally prefer visual signals from one eye to the other. To right-handers, their right eyes often dominate visually and vice versa.

Eye dominance determines which hand a shooter uses to hold their firearm and pull the trigger. It’s easy to differentiate your dominant hand from the weaker one, but can you tell which one your dominant eye is?

You use your dominant eye to help accurately aim down the sights of your firearm. While most shooters have similar eye and hand dominance, some find themselves in the cross-dominance category. This odd situation can make it harder for a shooter to use the iron sights of their shotgun.

When a shooter mistakenly aims with their non-dominant eye, the shot will deviate to the left or right of the target due to misalignment of sight. Good knowledge of eye dominance is of the utmost importance to beginner shooters as it can frustrate their range experience and make shooting more challenging.

How Right-Handed Shooters Can Overcome Left Dominance

Accurate aiming is a good skill in archery and firing guns. Shooters who are fortunate to have similar hand-eye dominance will find it easier on the range as they can choose to keep their eyes open during shooting. On the other hand, cross-dominant people may have to close their dominant eyes before they can get a good shot. Choosing to shut your dominant eye is another hell of a task because you will have to stress your facial muscles to close your dominant eye as you take shots. This practice can ruin your range experience. 

Here is how right hand shooters can overcome their left eye dominance:

  • Apply Red Dot Sight

Cross-dominant individuals who use red dot sights can enhance their shooting accuracy. When you keep your two eyes open while using the red dot, this will ensure that your dominant eye (the left) remains in focus on the target – your right eye will then focus on the reticle.

  • Train Your Right Eye To Be Dominant

With practice, some people can trick their other eye to be the dominant one. This kind of training involves blocking your normal dominant eye’s vision by covering it with a patch, in which case you can force your right eye to adjust and become the new dominant eye.

Wearing a patch on your dominant eye (say the left) is a more effective strategy to improve your shooting skills both on and off the range. However, the technique may not work like a charm for all shooters, as with time, your fake dominant eye can lose its dominance when you remove the patch on the other one.

  • Learn How To Shoot With Your Opposite Hand

This means if you find it hard to change your eye dominance, your other option is to try to shoot offhand. It may feel weird to take your first shot with long guns, but you can get better with time. Being cross-dominant doesn’t automatically make you a bad marksman – you just have to learn to adapt to your situation and take your time.

How To Figure Out Your Dominant Eye

Try to point at a distant object with your two eyes open, then look along your arm as you point your finger, focusing on the target. Close your eyes one after the other, and you will realize that the dominant one will be on target while the non-dominant eye deviates.

If this pointing experiment does not work, you may have a middle or central vision. This condition will cause right-handed shooters to miss their targets to the left and vice versa for left-handed shooters.  

Statistics show that about 85% of the world’s population experience right-hand dominance. Roughly two out of three people are right-eye dominant, while one-third experience left-eye dominance. Only a handful of individuals have no specific eye dominance at all. If you find yourself missing your targets on the range, it might be that you are cross-dominant.

Eye dominance refers to the tendency to favor one eye over the other when you try to maintain your binocular vision. The situation occurs at the subconscious level, and it affects a good number of shooters out there. People with this condition have brains that naturally prefer visual signals from one eye to the other. To right-handers, their right eyes often dominate visually and vice versa.

Eye dominance determines which hand a shooter uses to hold their firearm and pull the trigger. It’s easy to differentiate your dominant hand from the weaker one, but can you tell which one your dominant eye is?

You use your dominant eye to help accurately aim down the sights of your firearm. While most shooters have similar eye and hand dominance, some find themselves in the cross-dominance category. This odd situation can make it harder for a shooter to use the iron sights of their shotgun.

When a shooter mistakenly aims with their non-dominant eye, the shot will deviate to the left or right of the target due to misalignment of sight. Good knowledge of eye dominance is of the utmost importance to beginner shooters as it can frustrate their range experience and make shooting more challenging.

How Right-Handed Shooters Can Overcome Left Dominance

Accurate aiming is a good skill in archery and firing guns. Shooters who are fortunate to have similar hand-eye dominance will find it easier on the range as they can choose to keep their eyes open during shooting. On the other hand, cross-dominant people may have to close their dominant eyes before they can get a good shot. Choosing to shut your dominant eye is another hell of a task because you will have to stress your facial muscles to close your dominant eye as you take shots. This practice can ruin your range experience. 

Here is how right hand shooters can overcome their left eye dominance:

  • Apply Red Dot Sight

Cross-dominant individuals who use red dot sights can enhance their shooting accuracy. When you keep your two eyes open while using the red dot, this will ensure that your dominant eye (the left) remains in focus on the target – your right eye will then focus on the reticle.

  • Train Your Right Eye To Be Dominant

With practice, some people can trick their other eye to be the dominant one. This kind of training involves blocking your normal dominant eye’s vision by covering it with a patch, in which case you can force your right eye to adjust and become the new dominant eye.

Wearing a patch on your dominant eye (say the left) is a more effective strategy to improve your shooting skills both on and off the range. However, the technique may not work like a charm for all shooters, as with time, your fake dominant eye can lose its dominance when you remove the patch on the other one.

  • Learn How To Shoot With Your Opposite Hand

This means if you find it hard to change your eye dominance, your other option is to try to shoot offhand. It may feel weird to take your first shot with long guns, but you can get better with time. Being cross-dominant doesn’t automatically make you a bad marksman – you just have to learn to adapt to your situation and take your time.

How To Figure Out Your Dominant Eye

Try to point at a distant object with your two eyes open, then look along your arm as you point your finger, focusing on the target. Close your eyes one after the other, and you will realize that the dominant one will be on target while the non-dominant eye deviates.

If this pointing experiment does not work, you may have a middle or central vision. This condition will cause right-handed shooters to miss their targets to the left and vice versa for left-handed shooters.  

Statistics show that about 85% of the world’s population experience right-hand dominance. Roughly two out of three people are right-eye dominant, while one-third experience left-eye dominance. Only a handful of individuals have no specific eye dominance at all. If you find yourself missing your targets on the range, it might be that you are cross-dominant.

In one dominance study carried out on over 5000 subjects in the 1960s, it was observed that almost one-third of them were cross-dominant, 28% were right-handed but were left-eye dominant, while about 3.9% were left-handed but right-eyed.

In one dominance study carried out on over 5000 subjects in the 1960s, it was observed that almost one-third of them were cross-dominant, 28% were right-handed but were left-eye dominant, while about 3.9% were left-handed but right-eyed.